Berlin-based, Scottish artist Katie Paterson has become known for her multidisciplinary and conceptually-driven work with an emphasis on nature, ecology, geology and cosmology.  Many of her poetic installations have been the result of intensive research and collaboration with specialists as diverse as astronomers, geneticists, nanotechnologists, jewelers and firework manufacturers.

 

image Margaret Atwood named as the first writer to contribute to Katie Paterson's Future Library
News / Events
Margaret Atwood named as the first writer to contribute to Katie Paterson's Future Library
September 05 - October 24, 2014
image Katie Paterson, Future Library
Commission
Katie Paterson, Future Library
Public Commission
2014 - 2114
Oslo, Norway
image Katie Paterson wins the Visual Art Award at the South Bank Sky Arts Awards 2014
News / Events
Katie Paterson wins the Visual Art Award at the South Bank Sky Arts Awards 2014
January 27, 2014
London, England
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News / Events
Katie Paterson's 'Second Moon'
iPhone / iPad App
Sep 2013 - Sep 2014
Ongoing
ArtworksVideosThumbnails
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KATIE PATERSON Fossil Necklace, 2013 Installation: Kettle’s Yard Gallery & St Peter’s Church, Cambridge, UK Photographer: Paul Allitt

 

A necklace comprised of 170 carved, rounded fossils, spanning geological time.

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KATIE PATERSON Fossil Necklace, 2013 Installation: Kettle’s Yard Gallery & St Peter’s Church, Cambridge, UK Photographer: Paul Allitt

 

A necklace comprised of 170 carved, rounded fossils, spanning geological time.

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KATIE PATERSON Fossil Necklace, 2013 Installation: Kettle’s Yard Gallery & St Peter’s Church, Cambridge, UK Photographer: Paul Allitt

 

A necklace comprised of 170 carved, rounded fossils, spanning geological time.

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KATIE PATERSON Fossil Necklace, 2013 Installation: Kettle’s Yard Gallery & St Peter’s Church, Cambridge, UK Photographer: Paul Allitt

 

A necklace comprised of 170 carved, rounded fossils, spanning geological time.

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KATIE PATERSON History of Darkness, 2010 Ongoing slide archive 55 X 55 X 4.5 cm

 

History of Darkness is a slide archive; a life-long project, it will eventually contain hundreds upon thousands of images of darkness from different times/places in the history of the Universe, spanning billions of years. Each image handwritten with its distance from earth in light years, and arranged from one to infinity.

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KATIE PATERSON History of Darkness, 2010 Ongoing slide archive 55 X 55 X 4.5 cm

 

History of Darkness is a slide archive; a life-long project, it will eventually contain hundreds upon thousands of images of darkness from different times/places in the history of the Universe, spanning billions of years. Each image handwritten with its distance from earth in light years, and arranged from one to infinity.

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KATIE PATERSON History of Darkness (79,582,210 ly), 2010 Embossed archival silver gelatin photograph 48 X 48 cm

 

The History of Darkness prints are culled from the slide archive; a life-long project, it will eventually contain hundreds upon thousands of images of darkness from different times/places in the history of the Universe, spanning billions of years. Each printed image embossed with its distance from earth in light years, and sequenced from one to infinity.

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KATIE PATERSON As the World Turns, 2010 Modified Project Debut record player 37 X 21 3/8 X 20 inches

 

A turntable that rotates in time with the earth, one revolution every 24 hours, playing Vivaldi's Four Seasons. If performed from beginning to end, the record would play for four years. The movement is so slow it isn't visible to the naked eye, yet the player is turning, imperceptibly.

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KATIE PATERSON Inside this desert lies the tiniest grain of sand, 2010 2/5 Black and white photograph on resin coated paper

 

A grain of sand collected from the Sahara Desert was chiselled to 0.00005mm, using special techniques in nanotechnology. This new minute grain of sand was then taken back to the Sahara and buried deep within its vast desert sands.

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KATIE PATERSON Dying Star Letters, 2010 shelf, archival box, posted letters and envelopes, dimensions variable

 

Upon hearing the news that a star has died, the artist writes and posts a letter, announcing its death.

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KATIE PATERSON Dying Star Letters, 2010 shelf, archival box, posted letters and envelopes, dimensions variable, Installation view at Mead Gallery, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK

 

Upon hearing the news that a star has died, the artist writes and posts a letter, announcing its death.

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KATIE PATERSON Dying Star Letters, 2010 shelf, archival box, posted letters and envelopes, dimensions variable, Installation view at Mead Gallery, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK

 

Upon hearing the news that a star has died, the artist writes and posts a letter, announcing its death.

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KATIE PATERSON 100 Billion Suns, 2010 1/10 custom printed confetti, confetti cannon launcher, dimensions variable, Storm King Art Center, photo: Jerry L. Thompson

Gamma Ray Bursts are the brightest explosions in the universe, which burn with a luminosity 100 billion times that of our sun. The confetti cannons created for '100 Billion Suns' contain 3,216 pieces of paper whose colours correspond to each of these cosmic events. Every burst of confetti creates a miniature explosion of all of these vast explosions, in just under a second.

Cannons were set off at regular intervals during the vernissage of the 54th Venice Biennale at a series of unspecified locations around Venice, from major piazzas to the smallest back streets. Each explosion is documented in a photographic archive, showing a unique perspective of Venice during the opening days of the Biennale: 100 Billion Suns (Venice)

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KATIE PATERSON 100 Billion Suns, 2010 1/10 custom printed confetti, confetti cannon launcher, dimensions variable

 

Gamma Ray Bursts are the brightest explosions in the universe, which burn with a luminosity 100 billion times that of our sun. The confetti cannons created for '100 Billion Suns' contain 3,216 pieces of paper whose colours correspond to each of these cosmic events. Every burst of confetti creates a miniature explosion of all of these vast explosions, in just under a second.

 

Cannons were set off at regular intervals during the vernissage of the 54th Venice Biennale at a series of unspecified locations around Venice, from major piazzas to the smallest back streets. Each explosion is documented in a photographic archive, showing a unique perspective of Venice during the opening days of the Biennale: 100 Billion Suns (Venice)

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KATIE PATERSON 100 Billion Suns, 2010 1/10, custom printed confetti, confetti cannon launcher, dimensions variable

Gamma Ray Bursts are the brightest explosions in the universe, which burn with a luminosity 100 billion times that of our sun. The confetti cannons created for '100 Billion Suns' contain 3,216 pieces of paper whose colours correspond to each of these cosmic events. Every burst of confetti creates a miniature explosion of all of these vast explosions, in just under a second.

Cannons were set off at regular intervals during the vernissage of the 54th Venice Biennale at a series of unspecified locations around Venice, from major piazzas to the smallest back streets. Each explosion is documented in a photographic archive, showing a unique perspective of Venice during the opening days of the Biennale: 100 Billion Suns (Venice)

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KATIE PATERSON All the Dead Stars, 2009 4/4 Laser etched anodized aluminum 200.03 X 300.04 cm

 

A map documenting the locations of just under 27,000 dead stars - all that have been recorded and observed by humankind.

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KATIE PATERSON All the Dead Stars (detail), 2009 4/4 Laser etched anodized aluminum 200.03 X 300.04 cm

 

A map documenting the locations of just under 27,000 dead stars - all that have been recorded and observed by humankind.

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KATIE PATERSON Light bulb to Simulate Moonlight, 2008 1/9 Light bulb with halogen filament, frosted coloured shell, 28W, 4500K, log book 85 X 83 X 92 cm

 

Produced with the lighting company OSRAM in series of 'lifetimes', each set contains a sufficient quantity of light bulbs to provide a person with a lifetime supply of moonlight, based on the current average life-span for a human being alive in 2008. (Each bulb burns for 2000 hours, a lifetime contains 289 bulbs).

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KATIE PATERSON Light bulb to Simulate Moonlight, 2008 1/9 Light bulb with halogen filament, frosted coloured shell, 28W, 4500K, log book 85 X 83 X 92 cm

 

Produced with the lighting company OSRAM in series of 'lifetimes', each set contains a sufficient quantity of light bulbs to provide a person with a lifetime supply of moonlight, based on the current average life-span for a human being alive in 2008. (Each bulb burns for 2000 hours, a lifetime contains 289 bulbs).

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KATIE PATERSON Langjökull, Snæfellsjökull, Solheimajökull, 2007 3/3, Three digital films on DVD, Duration: 1 hour 57 minutes, Installation view from The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Fort Worth, Texas

 

Sound recordings from three glaciers in Iceland, pressed into three records, cast, and frozen with the meltwater from each of these glaciers, and played on three turntables until they completely melt. The records were played once and now exist as three digital films. The turntables begin playing together, and for the first ten minutes as the needles trace their way around, the sounds from each glacier merge in and out with the sounds the ice itself creates. The needle catches on the last loop, and the records play for nearly two hours, until completely melted.

image 21

KATIE PATERSON Langjökull, Snæfellsjökull, Solheimajökull, 2007 3/3, Three digital films on DVD, Duration: 1 hour 57 minutes, Installation dimensions variable

 

Sound recordings from three glaciers in Iceland, pressed into three records, cast, and frozen with the meltwater from each of these glaciers, and played on three turntables until they completely melt. The records were played once and now exist as three digital films. The turntables begin playing together, and for the first ten minutes as the needles trace their way around, the sounds from each glacier merge in and out with the sounds the ice itself creates. The needle catches on the last loop, and the records play for nearly two hours, until completely melted.

image 22

KATIE PATERSON Vatnajokull (the sound of), 2007 4/5, Bespoke box, neon, iPod, headphones, photographs, 38 1/4 x 22 1/2 x 48 inches (97 x 57 x 122 cm)

 

An underwater microphone lead into Jökulsárlón lagoon - an outlet glacial lagoon of Vatnajökull, filled with icebergs - connected to an amplifier, and a mobile-phone, which created a live phone line to the glacier. The number +44(0)7757001122 could be called from any telephone in the world, the listener put through to Vatnajökull. A white neon sign of the phone number hung in the gallery space.  The work now exists as an archive of that event.

image 23

KATIE PATERSON Vatnajokull (the sound of), 2007 4/5, Bespoke box, neon, iPod, headphones, photographs, 38 1/4 x 22 1/2 x 48 inches (97 x 57 x 122 cm)

 

An underwater microphone lead into Jökulsárlón lagoon - an outlet glacial lagoon of Vatnajökull, filled with icebergs - connected to an amplifier, and a mobile-phone, which created a live phone line to the glacier. The number +44(0)7757001122 could be called from any telephone in the world, the listener put through to Vatnajökull. A white neon sign of the phone number hung in the gallery space.  The work now exists as an archive of that event.

image 24

KATIE PATERSON Vatnajokull (the sound of), 2007 4/5, Bespoke box, neon, iPod, headphones, photographs, 38 1/4 x 22 1/2 x 48 inches (97 x 57 x 122 cm)

 

An underwater microphone lead into Jökulsárlón lagoon - an outlet glacial lagoon of Vatnajökull, filled with icebergs - connected to an amplifier, and a mobile-phone, which created a live phone line to the glacier. The number +44(0)7757001122 could be called from any telephone in the world, the listener put through to Vatnajökull. A white neon sign of the phone number hung in the gallery space.  The work now exists as an archive of that event.

Artist BioDownload Bio English PDF
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Katie Paterson, Photo: Giorgia Polizzi

Katie Paterson has become known for her multidisciplinary and conceptually-driven work with an emphasis on nature, ecology, geology and cosmology.  Many of her poetic installations have been the result of intensive research and collaboration with specialists as diverse as astronomers, geneticists, nanotechnologists, jewelers and firework manufacturers. 

 

Among recent works are: Fossil Necklace (2013), a necklace comprised of 170 carved, rounded fossils, spanning geological time; Second Moon (2013), a work that tracks the cyclical journey of a fragment of the moon as it circles the Earth, via airfreight courier, on a man-made year-long commercial orbit; All the Dead Stars (2009), a large map documenting the locations of 27,000 dead stars known to humanity; Light bulb to Simulate Moonlight (2009), an incandescent bulb designed to transmit wavelength properties identical to those of moonlight; and History of Darkness (ongoing), a slide archive of darkness captured at different times and places throughout the universe and spanning billions of years.  As Erica Burton, curator at Modern Art Oxford, wrote at the time of a solo exhibition in 2008, “Katie Paterson’s work engages with the landscape, as a physical entity and as an idea. Drawing on our experience of the natural world, she creates an expanded sense of reality beyond the purely visible.”

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Katie Paterson, Earth Moon Earth, 2007

Earth-Moon-Earth (E.M.E) is a form of radio transmission whereby messages are sent in Morse code from earth, reflected from the surface of the moon, and then received back on earth. The moon reflects only part of the information back – some is absorbed in its shadows, ‘lost’ in its craters. For this work Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata was translated into morse code and sent to the moon via E.M.E. Returning to earth fragmented by the moon's surface, it has been re-translated into a new score, the gaps and absences becoming intervals and rests. In the exhibition space the new 'moon–altered' score plays on a self-playing grand piano.

 

Katie Paterson (born 1981, Glasgow, Scotland) received her BA from Edinburgh College of Art, Edinburgh, United Kingdom in 2004 and her MFA from the Slade School of Fine Art in London, United Kingdom in 2007.  She has since participated in solo exhibitions at the Mead Gallery at the University of Warwick, Coventry, UK and at Kettle’s Yard at the University of Cambridge, Cambridge UK (2013); the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Fort Worth, Texas, and BAWAG Contemporary, Vienna, Austria (2012);  James Cohan Gallery, New York, NY (2011) and Modern Art Oxford, Oxford, UK (2008). She has participated in group exhibitions at; the Power Plant, Toronto, Canada; the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; the Renaissance Society, Chicago, IL; the Hayward Gallery, London, UK; Turner Contemporary, Margate, UK; and her work has also been featured in the Whitstable Biennial 2010, Whitstable, UK; PERFORMA 09, New York, NY; and Altermodern: Tate Triennial 2009, Tate Britain, London, UK.  She has been the recipient of the John Florent Stone Fellowship at Edinburgh College of Art, and was the Leverhulme Artist in Residence in the Astrophysics Group at the University College London for the academic year 2010-2011.  Her work can be found in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY; and the National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh, UK.  Katie Paterson lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

Exhibitions
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Gallery Exhibition
Continuum
Peter Matthews, Katie Paterson, Karen Seapker
January 07 - February 05, 2011
New York
Press / Media
Articles / Reviews
Sculpture Magazine
"Dark Matter: A Conversation with Katie Paterson," by Joshua Reiman
Articles / Reviews
Vice
“An artist is growing a forest that’ll become a library of books in 100 years,” by Nell Frizzell
Articles / Reviews
Apollo Magazine
“Looking ahead: Katie Paterson discusses her ‘Future Library’,” by Crystal Bennes
Articles / Reviews
The New York Times Sunday Review
"Katie Paterson," by Kate Murphy
Articles / Reviews
The New York Times Sunday Review
"2114: A Library Project"
Articles / Reviews
The New York Times ArtsBeat
"New Margaret Atwood Work Coming in … 2114?", by Jennifer Schuessler
Articles / Reviews
Scotland on Sunday
“Book may be a bestseller – but not for 100 years,” by Stephen McGinty
Articles / Reviews
Artnet News
"Margaret Atwood Is First Writer Chosen for Katie Paterson Project," by Eileen Kinsella
Articles / Reviews
ARTnews
"Margaret Atwood joins Katie Paterson’s public art project, ‘Future Library,’" by M.H. Miller
Articles / Reviews
Slate
"No One Will Read Margaret Atwood’s Newest Work For 100 Years," by Lily Hay Newman
Articles / Reviews
The Guardian
“Margaret Atwood's new work will remain unseen for a century,” by Alison Flood
Articles / Reviews
Hyperallergic
"Artist’s 100-Year Project Will Grow Books from Saplings," by Jillian Steinhauer
Articles / Reviews
The Independent
"Katie Paterson, artist: 'I do not want to re-create. I want to be doing the next thing.'," by Karen Wright
Articles / Reviews
Artnet News
"Meteorite Sculpture Will Be International Space Station's First Artwork," by Sarah Cascone
Articles / Reviews
Blouin Artinfo
"Katie Paterson to Launch Meteorite Into Orbit," by Scott Indrisek
Articles / Reviews
ARTnews
"Katie Paterson Will Send Artwork to the International Space Station"
Articles / Reviews
The Times
"The Turner-tipped artist who's literally out of this world," by Mike Wade
Articles / Reviews
The Paris Review
"Future Library" by Dan Piepenbring
Articles / Reviews
E-flux
“Laisser les sons aller où ils vont (Let sounds go wherever they would go)”
Articles / Reviews
Artinfo
"Katie Paterson Takes the Very Long View," by Scott Indrisek
Articles / Reviews
BBC News
“Tracey Emin and Arctic Monkeys win South Bank awards,” by Michael Osborn
Articles / Reviews
The Guardian
"When a young artist meets an ancient meteorite," by Vanessa Thorpe
Articles / Reviews
Modern Painters
"Staring into Space: Katie Paterson Shoots for the Heavens," by Coline Milliard
Articles / Reviews
The Guardian
"Katie Paterson, the cosmicomical artist," by Brian Dillon
Articles / Reviews
katiepaterson.org
100 Billion Suns - an online archive
Articles / Reviews
Rhizome
"Interview with Katie Paterson" by Ceci Moss
Articles / Reviews
Independent
“Close-Up: Katie Paterson,” by Mike Higgins
News
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News / Events
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News / Events
July 29, 2014
Guiana Space Centre in Kourou, French Guiana
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Commission
Public Commission
2014 - 2114
Oslo, Norway
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News / Events
Performance
March 30, 2014
Civico Planetario "Ulrico Hoepli", Milan
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Museum Exhibition
Group Exhibition
Feb 28 - Mar 16, 2014
Adelaide, Australia
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News / Events
January 27, 2014
London, England
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Gallery Exhibition
Group Exhibition
Jan 10 - Feb 15, 2014
Berlin, Germany
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Museum Exhibition
Group Exhibition
Sep 15 -Dec 15, 2013
Chicago, Illinois
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News / Events
iPhone / iPad App
Sep 2013 - Sep 2014
Ongoing
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Museum Exhibition
Solo Exhibition
May 2 - June 22, 2013
Coventry, UK
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Museum Exhibition
Apr 26 - Jun 30, 2013
Cambridge, UK
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News / Events
Campo del Cielo, Field of Sky
July 28 - Aug 5, 2012
London, UK
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Museum Exhibition
Solo Exhibition
Mar 4 - Apr 15, 2012
Fort Worth, Texas
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Museum Exhibition
Group Exhibition
Sep 3, 2011 - Mar 4, 2012
Chicago, Illinois
Books
image Katie Paterson: Inside this Desert
Publication
Katie Paterson: Inside this Desert
Editions
image KATIE PATERSON: Future Library certificate
Edition
KATIE PATERSON: Future Library certificate